Contact Lenses

Contact lenses are worn by millions of Americans with refractive abnormalities such as myopia (nearsightedness), astigmatism (uneven focusing of light), hyperopia (farsightedness), and now presbyopia (the result of the hardening of the lens). In addition, rare conditions such as keratoconus (cone-shaped cornea) are better-addressed with contact lenses than with glasses. Drs. Cynthia H. Jun and Christine B. Luzuriaga at the Center for Total Eye Care are highly trained and experienced with all types of contact lenses.

How do contact lenses work?

Each contact lens is made according to a prescription to focus light on the retina of your eye, similar to what the lenses in eyeglasses do. However, contact lenses correct your entire field of vision because all images reaching the eyes pass through the lenses.

Which lens is right for me?

Based on your prescription and individual needs, Dr. Jun or Dr. Luzuriaga will prescribe the most appropriate contact lenses for you:

  • Rigid Gas-permeable Lenses - These lenses float in the tear fluid, allowing more oxygen to reach the cornea when you blink.
  • Soft Lenses - Made from extremely soft plastic, soft lenses offer the most options, including daily disposable lenses and frequent replacement lenses.

Our optometrists also specialize in fitting lenses for more complicated cases, including patients with post-refractive surgery needs, dry eye, keratoconus, and other high refractive errors. These tough fits require a specialty lens:

  • Toric lenses - Correct astigmatism
  • Bifocal lenses - Correct both distant and near vision
  • Colored lenses - May enhance or change the color of your eyes
  • Aphakic lenses - For people who have had cataracts removed without lens implants
  • Keratoconic - To correct vision problems caused by keratoconus and other corneal irregularities
  • Scleral lenses - Placed over the white of the eye (sclera) - utilizes fluid held between the cornea and the contact lens to correct keratoconus, pellucid's marginal degeneration, refractive surgery, irregular conreas and/or scar tissue, and dry eye
  • Post-refractive surgery lenses - To enhance vision after refractive surgery